Do not use Safeguard self storage – Worst self storage ever

Sometimes it’s important for us to get reviews from our peers for you to get the right service. Today we feel it is our duty to tell the truth about awful service.

Self storage is something you might consider at some point and you have to know that safeguard self storage is the worst self storage ever. Do not use it.

Here is why:
– Their service is the worst. They don’t care about their clients and when you ask them for something they will never reply to you. They are not responsive at all.
– They overcharge and they never inform you about it. What they do is very simple. They charge you but after you close your account so you are not aware of it. Then, you get a call from a debt collection company and they force you to pay. You have 24 hours and you have no choice.
– Again if you try to contact them to get an explanation they will just say we haven’t done anything wrong. That’s too bad.

Thankfully, the FTC is here to protect us against companies like them. This is unfortunate that such companies but hopefully internet will help us make a difference between self storage at the right price and a rip off.

Tenants Insurance – A Guide For Students

With all the excitement of going to university or college and perhaps living away from home for the first time, it’s easy to forget some of the more mundane and practical aspects of life as a student. But as you embark on this important stage of your life, it’s time to face up to the reality of what it would mean if everything you own was destroyed in a fire, or stolen. How would you begin to pay for its replacement?

Whether you are living in a hall of residence, in a bedsit or a shared rented house, you need to take out appropriate tenants insurance to cover your belongings in the event of a disaster.

Tenants insurance policies cover the cost of replacing your personal possessions, up to an amount which is agreed with the insurer at the time you take out the cover. The limit should reflect the actual value of your possessions. It may take some time for you to work out the total, but if you do this accurately you won’t end up paying for a level of cover that is more than you actually need.

Remember that you need to include the value of your clothing, your books and any equipment you use for studying, your computer, audio equipment, television and DVD player and other things such as sports equipment, your bike and anything valuable such as jewellery or watches. Usually tenants insurance policies stipulate a maximum value on the amount they will pay out to replace an individual item. So if you know you have things worth more than this minimum, you should discuss this with the insurance company in order that appropriate extra cover can be added to your policy.

Something else that may well prove to be important to you as a student is that your tenants insurance policy can cover your possessions whilst they are temporarily away from your accommodation. This would apply during those occasions when you go back home to your parents during holidays or go travelling.

As a student it’s highly likely that you will be renting furnished accommodation and whilst the landlord is responsible for taking out insurance on the actual fabric of the building, you may be held liable for any damage you cause to items the landlord has provided in the accommodation. Furniture and appliances such as a fridge or cooker would be included in this category, as well as carpets, curtains and other fixtures and fittings. Tenants insurance can cover you for this liability, up to an amount which will be agreed with the insurer when you first take out the policy. This value is likely to be much lower than that placed on your own possessions, but it’s nevertheless an important part of the cover you need.

There are a number of companies providing tenants insurance policies and you should be able to find something suitable for your own requirements. Historically, it used to be more difficult to find this type of insurance, as companies were more reluctant to cover people living in rented accommodation, especially students. However, as the size of the rental market has increased in recent years, tenants insurance is becoming easier to find and the choice and range of policies available is better than ever.

A new venture that could be helpful for students

A lot of students plan to become entrepreneurs and we want to help our readers!

That’s why we wanted to give the opportunity to Derek Haake, founder of BookDefy, to talk about his new venture. Good luck to him and hopefully this could be really helpful for students!

Each semester students try and figure out ways to get more money for their used textbooks and ways to save when buying textbooks. One of the simplest ways for students to do this is to exchange their books with each other. Although simple in concept, it is much more difficult in practice. Trying to figure out who wants a textbook is very difficult, and it means talking to everyone you know, then posting signs around campus and filling out information on message boards. Then, if you do find someone interested, you end up meeting some stranger in a back alley to swap your book.

The bookstores love this and keep buying used books at a fraction of what students paid for them, meanwhile, selling that same book for 2 or 3 times what they paid the first student. As students, we take this because we have no real alternatives to feeding the bookstore monopoly.

All of this has changed with BookDefy.com. BookDefy is a social tool that allows students to privately and safely exchange their textbooks. BookDefy’s software allows students to quickly enter in their old textbooks (just by the book’s ISBN), and then allows other students to search for those same textbooks by course (if their professor participates in BookDefy), or by the book’s information. From here, students approach each other in an online environment privately (i.e. no information is disclosed until an exchange is scheduled). Students then meet up in a public location, one of BookDefy’s exchange partners, and exchange their textbooks in a relatively safe environment.

BookDefy is a free service for students, and most of all, the site focuses on online privacy. Unlike most websites out there, BookDefy does not sell a student’s personal information or disclose it to third parties. BookDefy is further regulated by the community – all of which are students (you must have a valid University e-mail address to join).

Some advice for your interviews during college – do not talk about your parents!

At Student Help Forum, we want to help people to find the job they want in this difficult economic environment. We are here to help you succeed!

Recently, we have been discussing with a few interviewers (grad school, recruiters,…) to get their feedback on successful interviews especially for college students trying to get an internship or a full-time position. We thought it could be a great way to support our readers. One of the recurring themes is the dependence over their parents. A lot of students do not realize that they spend too much time on their interviews talking about their parents or their family (brothers, sisters,cousins,…).

A few examples:
– “I decided to go to engineering school because both my parents are engineers”
– “I wanted to become a teacher because my father was a great teacher”
– “I decided to work for company X because my mother has been working there for Y years…”
– “I am actually passionate about movies but my mother told me it would be better for me to work in marketing…”
– “My brother did this so I decided to do the same…”
– “My sister is passionate about gambling and I am a big fan of poker and video slots…”

Though it can be an argument in your conversation, it does not support your candidacy. It proves that as a candidate you might not be able to make your own decisions and you are still dependent and your parents decide you. Interviewers don’t judge that but they just might feel that you are not exactly sure why you are here today. To avoid these traps, there is a simple trick: simply DO NOT mention your parents in these interviews. It’s as simple as that. It does not help your case and it’s not that complicated to avoid this subject. You have lots of topics to discuss for 30 minutes or more and there are many ways for you to be successful and get the job that you are looking for.

And when you get a job you will be able to celebrate with your friends and play beer pong for example…

A very nice iphone application: Memory Mice IQ Brain Teaser

A brand new game from JMT Apps: Memory IQ Brain Teaser.

It’s all about memorizing the right sequence of numbers and letters. It’s a lot of fun!

Check the app here: http://bit.ly/gRxanI

iPhone is a great device and on top of that you great applications to enjoy! It’s a good way to have fun and learn at the same time!

Don’t hesitate to send us iphone applications if you want us to review it!

7 tips to become more efficient at school

You are getting a lot of pressure from your parents to get good grades and you don’t know how to deal with that pressure… Especially at the beginning of college, you don’t know how to become more efficient and succeed to get good grades!

Student Help Forum gives you a few tips to help you get good grades and satisfy your parents…

1/ Find a subject that you really like! It’s nice to please your parents but at the end of the day you want to enjoy your studies and it will be easier if you find a subject that you are really interested in and that you enjoy! It will make it easier to spend hours studying it… When Mark Zuckerberg was studying at Harvard, he enjoyed coding and it was natural for him to spend hours coding and coding….
2/ Be honest with yourself: if you don’t like the subject, don’t do it…it would be waste of your time to study something that you are not interested in… Even if it does look good on your resume, you will not have a good time at school and those are probably the best years… don’t miss it!
3/ try to learn from the best: if you feel that someone gets good grades in your class, work with that person because you will learn a lot from him/her and on top of that you will hopefully make a good friend or even more friends if you want to work as a group!
4/ Be curious and learn from others: ask what they like and what they have done in the past… you will learn a lot from them…
5/ Talk to your professors… again they are probably passionate about their job and they are happy to share their knowledge! Don’t be shy and ask them questions and there is nothing such as a bad question… Just make sure that you understand!
6/ Read read and read… I know it seems boring to read and you don’t see the point but give it a try! start by reading books that you might be interested in even cheap textbooks…
7/ In conclusion, to be efficient, you need to enjoy what you do because if that’s the case you won’t be distracted and you will want to learn more about the subject…

Enjoy and have a good time and school is probably the best time of your life!

Find a job at Google in… 1999

In 1999, Google was a small start-up and looking for talented employees:

http://web.archive.org/web/19991106023352/www.google.com/jobs.html

This was the time to get on board and work for probably the most successful company this last decade…

People who started in 1999 have made some good money since then…

Next question is: who is the next Google?

OPT application

If you are an international student (F-1 visa) and you would like to stay in the US after you graduate, you can consider to apply for OPT that will give you the opportunity to work for 12 months after graduation. Application is not that complicated but there are a few things to understand before you apply. For example, you want to know your options before you travel abroad or when you have to apply and many other questions like that.

Luckily, UC Berkeley has done an amazing job and has answered all the questions you might have on OPT:
OPT tutorial – all your questions answered

Why Choose Math Tutoring for Students

It is very common to realize that you needsspecial attention to improve your performance in school.  Math tutoring is particularly useful for many students, especially when a parent is no longer able to help with complicated math homework (dad you already forgot that?). As a parent, you may be used to being a tutor of sorts for your children.  You have likely helped with countless projects and helped your kids study for math tests, history quizzes, and social studies exams.

This is a wonderful role for a parent, but math tutoring is far more difficult for most parents.  For many of us, no matter how well we did in school, math skills are simply forgotten when they aren’t used.  The majority of Americans no longer use geometry in their daily lives, and while percentages or simple equations may be easy to remember, more complex math skills are harder to bring out of the recesses of memory.

For this reason, instead of trying to teach your child yourself, good math tutoring sessions are far more productive for students.  To find good math tutoring, first start by asking your professors if they have any recommendations.  There may be older students, for example, who can tutor free of charge as a part of an after school program.

Or, you may find great math tutoring from a local college student who is looking to make some extra money and has recently taken all the classes relevant to your math needs.  If you are particularly fortunate, you may be able to find a local college student who is studying to be a math teacher, so that the student doing the math tutoring is actually practicing his or her teaching skills as well.  That is a win-win situation for everyone!

Overall, just remember that math tutoring can really help a child who is struggling with the subject.  Math is an area that is sometimes difficult for students to grasp and they simply need more one on one time to practice and also identify what they are doing wrong.  Math tutoring can provide that extra assistance, even if you as a parent remember none of your algebra training!

5 Ways to Balance LSAT Prep with College Classes

If you have a full college courseload and social life, it’s probably hard to balance the two already. Add studying for the LSAT to the mix, and you may feel overwhelmed. This post gives you 5 ways to balance studying for the LSAT (or GRE, GMAT, MCAT, etc.) with school and life obligations. I’ll speak about the LSAT in this article, but just apply my advice to your relevant exam.

1. Start your LSAT prep early.
It’s much easier to do a little bit each week over the course of several weeks than to cram all your studying at once. It’s less stressful, and it won’t detract as much from schoolwork or your social life. Plan ahead and treat the LSAT as if it were another college class, and study for it over the course of the semester. You may also choose to take a class at an online university if you learn better with instruction.

2. Fit in studying wherever you can.
Doing an LSAT Logic Game or a couple of Logical Reasoning questions between classes can keep you in the LSAT mind-set even if you’re not studying for a few hours each day.

3. Set aside specific days and times each week to study.
This will ensure that a few weeks or months don’t go by while your LSAT prep books gather dust in the corner. Create a study schedule and stick to it.

4. Stay off AIM, Facebook, and Gmail, and close your laptop.
I know computers and Internet are ubiquitous on college campuses, especially for socializing. However, you don’t need a computer to study for the LSAT, and having one around will only serve as a distraction. Get rid of these time-suckers and stick to the books.

5. Form a study group.
If you can find people on your college campus (or in your neighborhood) who are also preparing for the LSAT, it may help to form a study group. Try to find study partners whose abilities complement your own so that you can help each other. Meeting on a regular basis will take some of the isolation out of test prep, and, like a gym buddy, a study partner will help motivate you to study.

Would-Be Bankers Turn to Consulting

A really interesting article from Business Week which shows one of the recent trends following the financial crisis. As students are not able to find jobs in investment banks, some of them are swithcing to consulting. That’s why the competition to get into consulting is going to be tougher this year…

http://www.businessweek.com/bschools/content/oct2008/bs2008107_579554.htm

7 + 3 ways to boost GPA

Reading

GPA or Grade Point Average, is the one deciding factor that compares the quality of your work with your classmates and ranks you accordingly. The higher your GPA the better. But sometimes it is much harder to increase this simple number than it first seems. Thankfully, there are some simple steps you can take to boost your GPA. Pick the Brain has provided a few tips on this very topic, but I have found a few more that prove very useful.

John Wesley’s original 7 tips include:

  1. Go to class – You would be surprised how often this is not followed. When you get to university you will learn that nothing is compulsory, and none of your lecturer’s will care if you go to their courses or not, so it is extremely difficult to stay focused and motizated.
  2. Sit in the Front Row – Not my favourite place to sit in a class, but it will get you involved, and make it easier to learn more.
  3. Take Notes by Hand – I am a massive supporter of this idea. I don’t think that you learn as easily just by following through printed notes. Actually writing the information down engages a different part of your brain, meaning that you are thinking about the concept and memorizing it at the same time.
  4. Do a weekly review – I have never tried this, but I suspect that it would work well. Most of the time you do this automatically however, whenever you are studying for an exam or preparing an assignment.
  5. Go to office hours – Again, I have never tried this, because I do not think that intruding on a lecturer in their time is of any benefit. If you have any questions, just ask them during your classes or directly afterwards.
  6. Find smart people to work with – Working through questions, and analysing key concepts can be a great way to fully understand the topic you are studying. It is for this reason that I encourage everyone to get a mentor. Someone older who can help you out, but have a smart fellow student in your same course can often be just as good.
  7. Avoid all-nighters – All-nighters are not the most pleasant experience, but most of you will do at least one of two in the next few years. Sometimes they are unavoidable, but I would try to eliminate them as much as possible.

My three additional thoughts on how to increase your GPA are of a different thought process, but are still highly valuable.

  1. Take easier courses – Make sure they are related to your major, but taking a few easy courses is a great way to boost your GPA. You just have to make certain that you will score extremely highly in all the assignments and exams. Remember, most courses are weighed the same, so a quick, simple course can be a great way to increase your GPA.
  2. Focus on the important assessment – It can be very irritating, but it is often the case that some of the least important assignments in terms of marks can be the hardest and take the most amount of time. Try to focus on the assignments and exams that will have the biggest impact on your overall grade.
  3. Remove distractions – Acquiring a high GPA can mean a lot of study. This is a very hard thing to do for many people, so you must help yourself out as much as possible. A good way to do this is to remove all distractions from your study area – TVs, computer games, mobile phones…

Having a high GPA can mean a lot when you are trying to get your first major job, or if you are trying for scholarships and academic awards. Often it is not easy to increase this number by a lot, but it is worth a try!

6 Tips for Organizing Research

Intro/Hook.

  1. Download the articles you plan on using, and save them in a single folder. You don’t want to pay the penalty for someone else’s site going down, or free content being transferred to a paid archive. If the source website doesn’t allow you to save the article to your website, there are two workarounds. First, you can hit print as if you were going to print it, and then select Save As File (or something like that). This option will divert the output going to the printer and capture it in a PostScript file, which you can open on any Windows machine. My favorite way to save articles is Yahoo! MyWeb. Find out how to use MyWeb to save your articles
  2. Discover new sources using your old ones. Every journal article contains a wealth of research. Look in the bibliography.
  3. Take notes with citations.
  4. Use Google’s Cited By links to judge a paper’s influence.
  5. Read Intro/Conclusion for fast answers.
  6. For multiple papers from same author, start with most recent work

Simplification – The Key to Success

Taking notes during lectures is perhaps the most important part of retaining knowledge throughout your university semmester, but most students are simply not that good at it. They tend to focus on either writing down every word your lecturer says, and just the important points. There is a much easier method which will definetly pay off when final exams come around.

Simplification!

I have used this method for many months and it always works perfectly. The general idea is to write down the heading of the topic, and write down in the simplest way possible what it is about. Try to imagine that you are talking to a younger child. But you also have to remember to include all the complication information towards the end.

The reason this works is that the next time you look over your notes it may have been weeks since you wrote the information down, and you will not remember what you were talking about. Having a simplified description means that you will remember the basis of the notes instantly, and from there you can focus on the complex concepts, equations, or explanations.

While this may sound counter-intuitive, it really does work.

This method is based on the ever popular K.I.S.S idea (Keep it Simple, Stupid). Trying to keep all of your ideas in their simplest form allows you to really understand the principles rather than just memorize facts. It also gives you more time to learn the more difficult concepts.

Learning the basics is key for any student. Most of the knowledge that you will learn are just extensions of the basic ideas given in the first few weeks. Understanding, not only how to use them, but why is very important, and truly is the key to success.

Naturally there are hundreds of different methods of taking notes, but time and time again simplification seems to reign supreme. Although taking notes in an easy to understand manner does not mean that you skip the hard topics. The idea is that you take a hard concept, and re-interpret it in your own words. The use of images or diagrams can also be very beneficial when trying to convert a difficult problem into a series of simple ones.

The main difficulty with converting to this method of note taking is the mental difficulties. Some people will feel that they are leaving out important information, while others will be able to start with little difficulty. The only way to try out this method is to start today. While it may suit some students, others will find it too restricting.

Stop Hunting Around for Lost Articles: Use Yahoo! MyWeb

Have you ever “lost” an article?

You know what I’m talking about — you started reading something great, bookmarked it, and then when you went looking for it two months later the only thing you can find is 404 Page Not Found? Or maybe you found it, but now the website wants you to fork over some cash in order to see it?

I hate emailing myself a link, or bookmarking it, only to learn later that the material is off-limits. The biggest culprit was the New York Times. Until recently, they would charge you for access to articles that were more than 10 days old. That meant that if I read a great editorial and the topic came up during a discussion with someone two weeks later, I couldn’t send him the link (how many students pay to read archived news?).

But there were other sites too – for instance, a couple of years ago, Poynter.org ran an amazing article series called Fifty Writing Tools. It was the best writing advice I’d ever received, and I bookmarked the index page so that I could come back to read it again and again. A few months ago, I went back to Poynter to find that half of the links were broken. I wish I could have saved those articles somewhere, and shared them with some of my friends who are aspiring journalists. (Incidentally, in writing this article I went back to Poynter and was absolutely delighted to find that the writing tips are back in the form of podcasts. Check them out at http://www.poynter.org/column.asp?id=78&aid=103943).

Digg and del.icio.us are fantastic social bookmarking sites, but they don’t allow you to save your own copies of a web page.

Yahoo! introduced a very handy resource for bookmarking pages a couple of years ago. It’s part of Yahoo! MyWeb, which is still in Beta – I guess they were taking a page from the book of Google, no pun intended. (Alright, maybe a little.)

Head over to http://myweb.yahoo.com, and once you’ve signed up, click on My Bookmarks. Since you’re just starting out, you don’t have any bookmarks. So let’s add one. On the MyWeb banner with the search box, find the link for Add Page. When you click it, a pop-up window will open up asking you for the url of the page and some other details. I took a screenshot of my own MyWeb Bookmarks page, with the window open.

Screenshot of MyWeb

As you can see, it is possible to set both public and private access levels. However, the option we are most interested in appears all the way at the bottom, in the form of a checkbox next to “Store a copy of this page.” Fill out the form, making sure that this option is checked.

When you submit the page, you’ll see something like the display in the background of my screenshot, in the main browser window. As you can see, I have saved four articles (more, actually), and for three of those articles I have added the note “For use in blog”. I got tired of linking to articles only to have them moved to paid archives (see earlier rant about New York Times). Those dates say 2008 but they are actually 2005 (I edited something small so it updated the date). If you click the titles, you will be taken to www.nytimes.com. However, if you click the little link that says “My saved copy” that I’ve circled in red, you’ll be taken to this page. Isn’t that cool?

Some convenient toolbars for your browser are available here. And if you want to use Yahoo! MyWeb for your social bookmarking, you can share saved pages with friends and colleagues under the My Contacts tab. You’ll have to add a contact first, but after that you can share easily. Try it out — my user is sadp182.

I use MyWeb occasionally to bookmark my favorite articles, to save a link when I’m putting it up on my blog, and for saving internet-based references when I’m doing research and need to be able to come back later. I hope you’ll find it useful as well!